Best Hair Growth Oils For Black Hair

Different hair colors often mean different hair types and different hair needs. If you are rocking your dark hair, read on and find out which oils may be best for you.

Think about it, years ago there weren’t many options lying around for women (and men) with black hair. Let’s not forget that the textures for this color, like any other, vary as well! You no longer have to rely on products that contain petroleum and other contents that only take a toll on your hair’s health.

Yes, if you didn’t already know, petroleum is not that great for black hair. Why? It tends to be slightly or even alarmingly suffocating, but you didn’t have much choice then. That isn’t the case anymore. Welcome to the modern world where you have unlimited products for every hair type available.

However, you can’t always trust what the manufacturers are cooking. Some may be genuine and offer their complete lists of the ingredients they use in your hair product. Others? Not so much. You get so many promises to get the curls you’ve wished for finally, and less frizz than you always have to deal with – most of these promises don’t come through. There are a couple of natural oils you should stock up on right now.

Fantastic Hair Growth Oils For Black Hair

Coconut Oil

It should be obvious by now; coconut is great for multiple hair types. Most oils can help seal in the moisture that’s already in your hair, but coconut oil does some actual moisturizing. You could say it has something to do with the coconut oil’s chemical structure. That organic coconut oil you use in the kitchen? Try it on your hair. I enjoy my Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil, and I’ve never looked back!

Olive Oil

Another oil you can cook and also consume for more health benefits. Look for high-quality olive oil like Colavita Extra Virgin olive oil that has as little refining or processing to it as possible. Olive oil is a known moisturizer that can relieve a dry, itchy, and flaky scalp. Go ahead and cook with it too and apply on your skin.

Jamaican Black Castor Oil

Most women swear by this variation over the cold-pressed castor oil that is a pale yellow. Jamaican Black Castor Oils involves roasting the seeds first before crushing them, and the end product is a thicker dark brown oil that is popular for its consistency and strong smell.

I can attest to the quick hair growth I experienced after using Tropic Isle Living Jamaican Black Castor Oil. The results don’t come overnight, but I noticed thicker hair strands and less breakage. Just remember to use it sparingly and warm it a little for ease of use – too much, and it will weigh your hair down.

Sweet Almond Oil

You can also go with grapeseed oil since these two are a favorite for anyone who prefers lightweight hair oil. You can use these oils to seal in the moisture and nourish your scalp without leaving it all greasy and heavy. If you have an oily scalp, you should keep this in store. I use the Viva Natural brand for my sweet almond oil as well.

Conclusion

Instead of spending so much money on hair creams and products that may do more damage than good, pick the natural option right in your kitchen. Besides, apart from consuming most of these oils, you can even use them on your skin, eyebrows, eyelashes, and nails.

 

Marie Stevenson

Having been a victim of counterfeit products Marie Stevenson decided to comb various markets both online and physical to find the best original beauty products for women. The influx of counterfeits is palpitation inducing especially when you consider the aftermath. The consequences of using fake makeup or tanning lotions can be quite expensive and life-threatening and the reason why Marie decided to provide you with insightful information that will actually enhance your health. Apart from saving the world from the influx of fake beauty products Marie is a dedicated environmentalist, loves to travel and read. Her famous line is that if you believe it and have the passion to do something right then don’t let someone else discourage since they don’t understand where you are coming from.

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